Friday, March 18, 2011

What is Soy Lecithin and Why is it Found in So Many Products?

If you read nutrition labels and ingredient lists, you’ve probably come across “soy lecithin” more than a few times. It’s actually a very popular ingredient – one of the top 10 most used ingredients in processed foods.

But what exactly is it? What does it do?

And most importantly, what are its health and nutrition characteristics?

What you need to know:

Lecithins are oily substances that occur naturally in plants (soybeans) and animals (egg yolks).

Soy lecithin (E322) is extracted from soybeans either mechanically or chemically. It’s actually a byproduct of the soybean oil production.

Some people use it as a supplement because it’s high choline content. Choline is a micronutrient that is good for heart health and brain development.

But that’s not the reason soy lecithin is used as an additive in foods. It possesses emulsification properties. This means it can keep a candy bar “together” by making sure that the cocoa and the cocoa butter don’t separate. It is also used in bakery items to keep the dough from sticking and to improve its ability to rise.

Since soybeans are one of the cheapest crops in the US (thanks in part to federal subsidies to growers), it makes sense to use a cheap, natural soy derived emulsifier in food processing.

Most people with soy allergies needn’t worry about products containing soy lecithin, because it is derived from the soybean oil, whereas the allergy itself relates to the soy protein. However, if you read though the comments below, you’ll see that some people with soy allergy are sensitive to soy lecithin as well.

So go through your pantry (food cabinet) and find 5 foods that contain soy lecithin in its ingredient list. Post your answers…


article comes from :fooducate blog

Monday, March 14, 2011

where does our food come from...


... and when is it harvested.
A. Check out this interactive site and find out three states that product the following items:
1. apples (which month are they harvested)
2. broccoli
3. corn
4. cherries

B. Take a trip and find the local farms, farmer markets, and healthier foods sources with this interactive site. List three findings.

C. With this site what did you find interesting. Have you eating at any of the local restaurants that they talk about?


Post a comment, with your name to get credit for the assignment.

Friday, February 11, 2011

The fattest state in the union is.....


Mississippi is the fattest state for 5th straight year, Colorado still leanest
For 2010 Mississippi has claimed the title of fattest state for the fifth consecutive year, while Colorado continues its streak as the leanest. Maine rose the most places in the rankings over last year, while Oregon dropped the most, according to a new analysis by CalorieLab, Inc.


Most Obese States
Tennessee jumped from fourth place to tie last year’s second place state Alabama. Nine states have obese populations that exceed 30 percent over a three-year average, and in ten states two-thirds of the citizens were either overweight or obese by CDC standards in 2009.

Also not faring well this year was Maine, which rose six places to be the 29th fattest state, from last year’s 35th placing.


Thinnest States
Colorado repeats as the slimmest state, despite a slight increase in obesity of 0.2 percent over three years. In connection with a previous ranking Governor Bill Ritter of Colorado told CalorieLab, “We’re not spared from the national obesity epidemic, and we must remain vigilant in order to guard against it. We’re doing all we can to encourage Coloradans — especially our kids — to take advantage of the natural resources our state offers in order to stay fit, healthy and happy.”

Connecticut was the second skinniest state, with the District of Columbia third, with its three-year average obesity rate actually falling by 0.8 percent from last year. Alaska and Oregon were the only other states whose three-year average obesity rates fell.

Regional Obesity by State Trends
In general, states in the West and New England rank lowest in the fattest states rankings, while states in the South and the Rust Belt tend to rank highest.

CalorieLab computed the fattest state rankings for this year based on the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System database maintained by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The rankings use a three-year average in order to smooth out statistical fluctuations.

Because of the overall increase in obesity, CalorieLab this year again shifted the color coding used in its map one percentage point higher to maintain an approximately equal number of states per color. This means that this year’s map cannot be directly compared to previous years’ maps. CalorieLab’s United States of Obesity 2010 map is licensed for use by anyone in any media and can be downloaded in various formats (small GIF, large GIF, SVG, EPS).

article comes from: http://calorielab.com/index.html